Life in Denmark

danish-village
An impossibly quaint (where are the gnomes?) thatched roof village at the northern end of the island of Samso. It's a major tourist trap, even for Danes, in summer.

The world descended on Copenhagen these past two weeks—and ordinary Danes don’t like it. Beyond the snarled traffic and foreigners gazing mutely into their palms to try to figure out what coins are worth, there’s all the protesters disrupting orderly Danish Christmas lunches.

Yes, these are traditional opportunities for Danes to get drunk in the early afternoon. But there is a silver lining, according to my sources, since all the police in Denmark are in Copenhagen you can be pretty secure driving drunk in the rest of the country.

I suppose that’s a consolation for all the other inconveniences.

Did I mention drunk Danes stole my Earth Journalism Award?

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dbiello

I am an award-winning journalist writing primarily about the environment and energy. I have a book coming out in November 2016 about whether the planet has entered a new geologic age as a result of people's impacts and, if so, what we should do about this Anthropocene. It's called The Unnatural World. I’ve been writing for Scientific American since 2005 and have written on subjects ranging from astronomy to zoology for both the Web site and magazine. I’ve been reporting on the environment and energy since 1999 — long enough to be cynical but not long enough to be depressed. I am the author of a children’s book on bullet trains and write for publications ranging from Foreign Policy to The New Republic, speak on news radio and shows such as WNYC’s The Takeaway, NHPR’s Word of Mouth, and PRI’s The World and appear on television, ranging from The Weather Channel to serving as host of Beyond the Light Switch and the forthcoming The Ethanol Effect for PBS. I also happen to think Charles Darwin’s The Origin of Species is a surprisingly good read.